Archive for December, 2010

Full-Spectrum Light (issue 12)

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Around the world different people are talking about how they use full-spectrum lighting in their day-to-day lives.  We feature some of the best here.

HEALTH

What To Do When You’re Feeling Blue
If the weather or the short days are bringing you down, try to block the outside views and fill your space with as much light as possible. You might even get full spectrum light bulbs for your living and work space where you spend the …

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How light affects the brain

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

A recent (2010) University of Geneva study has concluded with the need to pay “more attention to our light environment at home and in the work place”.
 

University of Geneva scientists, working with others from England and Belgium, participated in a study that shows how the brain affects emotions in response to different kinds of light. Sophie Schwartz, from the university’s centre for neuroscience, tells Swisster about the significance of the research, which further explains seasonal affective disorder and why bright days can lift our spirits. (more…)


Full-Spectrum Light (issue 11)

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Around the world different people are talking about how they use full-spectrum lighting in their day-to-day lives.  We feature some of the best here.

HEALTH
Eliminating Distractions

Full-spectrum lighting is preferred in an autism education facility, but non-fluorescent lighting uses considerably more energy, and an operations budget …
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The Sun. What it really does to you.

Monday, December 6th, 2010

In New Zealand, 300 people die each year from melanoma (skin cancer).  It’s a country with a vested interest in fully understanding the UV/Vitamin D relationship.  This recent (Nov 13, 2010) article from a national magazine goes into the current debate.

Too Hot to Handle
The Listener

To go out in the sun to get the vitamin D essential for good health or to stay in the shade to avoid skin cancer? Ruth Laugesen tries to make sense of an increasingly controversial dilemma.

An oddity of human disease first piqued epidemiologist Robert Scragg’s interest back in the early 1980s. No one’s sure why, but winter is the killing season for cardiovascular disease. In most countries, 30-40% more people die from heart disease and strokes in winter than in summer. (more…)